Orgasm

The orgasm is the climax of the sexual response cycle, characterized by an extreme feeling of pleasure, and that can be achieved through masturbation or intercourse. Men and women can experience it, both featuring quick cycles of muscle contraction in the lower pelvic muscles surrounding the anus and the primary sexual organs. Females may also experience uterine and vaginal contractions. It is related to other involuntary actions such as vocalizations and muscular spasms, as well as an increase in heart rate. Ejaculation is usually more associated with male climax. Each discharge is linked to a pleasure wave felt in the penis and loins, but also in the lower spine or lower back. Multiple orgasms are also attainable.

Female orgasms do not usually present any kind of fluid production, although some women do experience a discharge of liquid. The aftermath is generally a relaxation feeling believed to be related to prolactin release in the bloodstream. Another chemical called oxytocin is also released, and it is credited with the pleasant feelings experienced during and after sex, including the feeling of closeness to one’s partner.

Female orgasms can be further divided into the vaginal orgasm and clitoral or clit orgasms. The vaginal orgasm as a separate entity was first suggested by Sigmund Freud in 1905. He suggested that clit orgasms were a solely adolescent occurrence, and that after puberty the normal reaction of a mature woman is to experience a vaginal orgasm. In a textbook case of an appeal to authority fallacy, even though Freud produced no evidence to back his claim about, just the fact that he said it made many women feel inadequate when they failed to reach climax through intercourse alone without clitoral stimulation. The truth is that most women are only able to climax by means of such stimulation.

In order to better understand clit orgasms, some knowledge about the clitoris is necessary, something we are very familiar with at Clitoris.com. The clitoris is a sexual organ in female mammals, located close to the anterior injunction of the labia minora above the opening of the urethra and vagina. In human females, the clitoris is the most sensitive erogenous area, and it can experience sexual excitement and clitoral erection. Therefore, it is no surprise that stimulation of this part is integral to achieving climax. During sexual arousal, the clitoris along with the rest of the genitalia become engorge with blood. Research has found that sustained and intense climax can be accomplished through clitoral stimulation.

In general, stimulation or foreplay is paramount to achieving sexual climax. Both genders can derive pleasure from stimulating the nerve endings around and in the anus, for example in anal sex. Some men are even able to reach climax through prostate stimulation alone. The prostate is found next to the rectum, and is the male counterpart of the Skene’s glands, thought to be linked to the female G-spot. Women can also find pleasure in anal stimulation, given that the clitoris has legs that reach around the vaginal lips and back into the anus. Also in women, breast and nipple stimulation has been known to lead to mild and intense climax. The breast and nipples are important erogenous zones that play a major part in foreplay, which in turn creates sexual excitement, facilitating arousing and climax. Men can find pleasure to from nipple stimulation, though not as heightened as a woman.

Some women, and in fewer cases men, have little to no refractory period, which the phase of recovery that ensues right after climax. This allows them to achieve two, three or more multiple orgasms, closely following the first one. Although this is more commonly a female phenomenon, some men are able to experience dry orgasms (without ejaculation) or the other way around, to ejaculate without reaching orgasms. This too reduces refractory period, enabling the production of multiple orgasms.

The sensation felt during and after climax varies from men to women, the main one being that female orgasms last longer. Other major difference would be the lack of ejaculation in women, although as was mentioned above, some women do discharge liquid from the paraurethral ducts. The source and nature of such a discharge has been and still is debated among experts, but it obviously has no reproductive purpose, like male ejaculation does.