Clitoris Anatomy

The clitoris is part of the reproductive organ in all female mammals and it is considered the homologous of the penis. In humans, this part of the female genitals has the appearance of a button and it is located near the anterior junction of the labia minora, right above the vagina. Although it is present in all mammal species, the clitoris is most special for humans. This area of the body is considered to be one of the most sensitive erogenous parts of the female body that can even become erect if appropriately stimulated. Moreover, it is now widely accepted that clitoral stimulation is mandatory if women are to experience sexual climax. This wonder button-like area is the key to female pleasure and yet one of the least unknown parts of the human body. Read on Clitoris.com what specialists already know about the clitoris and find out much more interesting information about it.

For a long time now, specialists did not know sufficient about the clitoris because unlike the male penis is much more difficult to observe. However, recently a consensus has been reached in what concerns the anatomy of the clitoris and which states that the clitoris is a very complex structure that goes much beyond its external and visible part. One of the most visible parts of this structure is the glans which is similar in both size and shape to a pea. The clitoral hood is the part that extends from the front of the labial commissure (where the labia majora meet at the pubic mound) and which covers most of or the entire clitoral glans or head.  The clitoris also presents clitoral crura made of corpora cavernosa (which also exists in the penis) which extends up to several centimeters, from the head back and along the shaft. This looks similar to an inverted ‘V’.  The clitoral crura are hidden behind the labia minora. This part of the clitoris has given birth to much controversy among the specialists as some believe that the clitoral crura end with an attachment to the pubic arch whereas others claim that they follow the interior of labia minor and actually meet at the fourchette. Also belonging to the clitoris there are the urethral sponge, muscles, pelvic diaphragm, perineal sponge, clitoral bulbs and obviously blood vessels and nerves.

The never ending subject of debate is how much of the clitoris protrudes from the hood. Some claim that the average width of the clitoral glans lies somewhere between 2.5 and 4.5 millimeters. However, more recent studies show that the clitoris extends around the vagina by a considerable distance. It is clear that specialists did not gather enough information about this hidden and intriguing part of the woman’s body but it is also certain that nowadays we know much more about it than we used to in the part. Perhaps the most important discovery is that there is much more to the clitoris than the small part that we can see and that most people associate with the word. In the end, the anatomy of the clitoris can provide us with a little inside in what this wonder of the body is and what it can do for women, if ‘used’ properly.